5 Steps to getting started on PCOS By Eti Jain

Did you know that 80% of women with PCOS have been found to be deficient in Vitamin D? That is huge! So, I think that a Vitamin D supplement is super important for all women with PCOS.

5 Steps to getting started on your PCOS Diet Plan

1.     Know your why

I’m the kind of person who has to know why I’m doing what I’m doing. I really struggle if someone tells me that I need to do something without telling me why. I can feel myself digging in my heels in resistance. If you tell me WHY, though, I’m far more likely to do what I’ve been asked, and not just do it, but do it whole heartedly.

So, in doing all of my research I found some very compelling evidence to explain exactly why we need to change our diets and what our new diet needs to look like. I have shared pieces of this throughout this site but if you would like a really comprehensive look at why diet is so key to managing PCOS and what your diet should look like, why not signup for my free PCOS Starter Kit where I share the most important elements to managing.  These are things I wish my Doctor had told me about PCOS. 

2.     Throw Out or Give Away the Junk Foods

I think it’s really helpful to go through your cupboards, fridge and freezer and work out what shouldn’t be there. If you don’t see it and don’t have it in the house, you are much less likely to crave it and if you do crave it, to get your hands on it.

So, what do I mean by junk? Start with the following foods:

  • Crisps
  • Chocolates
  • Biscuits
  • Potatoes
  • White rice
  • Pasta
  • Dairy products (Milk, Yogurt, Curd, Paneer, Chena Sweets)
  • Frozen ready meals – they’re far too processed and contain too many additives
  • Rice cakes (very high GI and taste like cardboard – no thanks!)
  • Processed meats
  • Sodas (even the diet variety)

3.     Stock up on PCOS Friendly Foods

5 Steps to getting started on PCOS By Eti Jain

If you can’t afford it, stock up on more plant-based protein as they tend to be less expensive and don’t have as many trans fats as meat does.

You will find a PCOS Pantry List and PCOS Substitutions List in the PCOS Starter Kit that I was telling you about. These lists will give you a good idea of what you need to stock up on when you do hit the shops.

4.     Plan your PCOS Meals

  • Dairy free
  • Low GI with a low Glycemic Load
  • Balanced in terms of carbs and protein
  • Free of refined foods and sugars
  • Low in saturated fats

Let’s be honest. Sometimes finding the recipes that meet that exact criteria can be tricky. And once we know that a recipe doesn’t have gluten or dairy, how do we even know what it will do to our insulin levels? This is where PCOS Foodies comes in.Nutrition data for any recipe at the touch of a button. Grocery lists done for you – and you’ll never leave them at home when you head to the shops cause you can just pull them up on a mobile app.

5.     Get Support to Stick with It

5 Steps to getting started on PCOS By Eti Jain

Starting something new like this can be tricky and when you get stressed or tired or hangry, it is so easy to fall back into your old way of eating. Getting support is invaluable when you’re struggling.

So, get someone on your team. It could be your partner, your best friend, someone else you know who has PCOS. But doing it together is much easier than doing it on your own.

Okay, so just to summarise some of the key points:

  • Following a good PCOS diet is crucial to managing your PCOS and it’s symptoms (its even more effective than medication).
  • A PCOS diet is gluten free, dairy free, soy free and focuses on foods with a low glycemic load to help you manage your insulin and testosterone levels.
  • It’s important to have a PCOS diet plan to help you make the transition to a new way of eating smoother.
  • There are 5 steps that will help you get started:
  1. Know your Why
  2. Throw out or giveaway the junk food
  3. Stock up on PCOS friendly foods
  4. Plan your PCOS meals
  5. Get Support

Did you know that 80% of women with PCOS have been found to be deficient in Vitamin D? That is huge! So, I think that a Vitamin D supplement is super important for all women with PCOS.

5 Steps to getting started on your PCOS Diet Plan

1.     Know your why

I’m the kind of person who has to know why I’m doing what I’m doing. I really struggle if someone tells me that I need to do something without telling me why. I can feel myself digging in my heels in resistance. If you tell me WHY, though, I’m far more likely to do what I’ve been asked, and not just do it, but do it whole heartedly.

So, in doing all of my research I found some very compelling evidence to explain exactly why we need to change our diets and what our new diet needs to look like. I have shared pieces of this throughout this site but if you would like a really comprehensive look at why diet is so key to managing PCOS and what your diet should look like, why not signup for my free PCOS Starter Kit where I share the most important elements to managing.  These are things I wish my Doctor had told me about PCOS. 

2.     Throw Out or Give Away the Junk Foods

I think it’s really helpful to go through your cupboards, fridge and freezer and work out what shouldn’t be there. If you don’t see it and don’t have it in the house, you are much less likely to crave it and if you do crave it, to get your hands on it.

So, what do I mean by junk? Start with the following foods:

  • Crisps
  • Chocolates
  • Biscuits
  • Potatoes
  • White rice
  • Pasta
  • Dairy products (Milk, Yogurt, Curd, Paneer, Chena Sweets)
  • Frozen ready meals – they’re far too processed and contain too many additives
  • Rice cakes (very high GI and taste like cardboard – no thanks!)
  • Processed meats
  • Sodas (even the diet variety)

3.     Stock up on PCOS Friendly Foods

5 Steps to getting started on PCOS By Eti Jain

SIf you can’t afford it, stock up on more plant-based protein as they tend to be less expensive and don’t have as many trans fats as meat does.

You will find a PCOS Pantry List and PCOS Substitutions List in the PCOS Starter Kit that I was telling you about. These lists will give you a good idea of what you need to stock up on when you do hit the shops.

4.     Plan your PCOS Meals

Planning your meals in advance should help you to be more organized when it comes to meal times. You’ll also have all of the ingredients you’ll need to prepare a healthy, nutritious meal that will help you get your PCOS under control.

When planning your meals, keep in mind that you’re looking for recipes that are:

  • Dairy free
  • Low GI with a low Glycemic Load
  • Balanced in terms of carbs and protein
  • Free of refined foods and sugars
  • Low in saturated fats

Let’s be honest. Sometimes finding the recipes that meet that exact criteria can be tricky. And once we know that a recipe doesn’t have gluten or dairy, how do we even know what it will do to our insulin levels? This is where PCOS Foodies comes in. Nutrition data for any recipe at the touch of a button. Grocery lists done for you – and you’ll never leave them at home when you head to the shops cause you can just pull them up on a mobile app.

5.     Get Support to Stick with It

5 Steps to getting started on PCOS By Eti Jain

Starting something new like this can be tricky and when you get stressed or tired or hangry, it is so easy to fall back into your old way of eating. Getting support is invaluable when you’re struggling.

So, get someone on your team. It could be your partner, your best friend, someone else you know who has PCOS. But doing it together is much easier than doing it on your own.

Okay, so just to summarise some of the key points:

  • Following a good PCOS diet is crucial to managing your PCOS and it’s symptoms (its even more effective than medication).
  • A PCOS diet is gluten free, dairy free, soy free and focuses on foods with a low glycemic load to help you manage your insulin and testosterone levels.
  • It’s important to have a PCOS diet plan to help you make the transition to a new way of eating smoother.
  • There are 5 steps that will help you get started:
  1. Know your Why
  2. Throw out or giveaway the junk food
  3. Stock up on PCOS friendly foods
  4. Plan your PCOS meals
  5. Get Support